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Twice a week we all pile into the car and drop Dad off to swim the bay so he can train for his next triathlon. His dedication to this training inspired this writing.

Nearly every day my husband is in training for his next triathlon. He runs daily, swims the bay twice a week, bike rides as much as possible, and dedicates his free time to conditioning and preparing himself. I lay in bed last night thinking, “why don’t women take the same approach to childbirth?

Triathletes train and prepare their body daily for a grueling 6-18 hour event. Birth is just as physically challenging; more so even! Why do we not train, prepare, and condition our bodies and minds just like athletes? No one in their right mind would start a triathlon without the proper training. Yes, women’s bodies were made to birth, but only a select few were truly made to compete with the gods of ironman. But still, women must know that they have to learn to trust their bodies, train their minds, and prepare for the most amazing of experiences– childbirth. When speaking of trust, no ironman would allow some third party to interrupt his Kona experience. No one jumps in at the marathon run and says, “I just don’t think you can do this, so let me intervene.” Spectators stand back, offer water and bananas for cramps, and cheer you on during the painful moments. And when you’re nearing the glorious finish line, they urge you to keep going, even when your legs feel they may give out and your head is spinning from the dizzying effects of the physical strain. Why doesn’t more of the community offer this support to laboring women? No one offers the athlete some morphine to dull the pain as he cramps up. He/she would reject it as it would dull this most amazing experience.

Birth is a triathlon! At first, the beginning stint is smooth and wet, swimming from the start. Then, the bike portion—climbing, stretching, and reaching for the next glorious level. Finally, the run- ah the run- the final stretch; the push beyond everything you felt possible toward a glorious finish. Sound familiar?

My husband does not do this for a medal, to win first place, or to prove anything to anyone. He does it for the experience and he doesn’t even get a soft, beautiful baby in the end! So train hard ladies—do it for you and no one else! Do not let anyone intervene. Experience the sacred power of birth. While there will be no crowd at the finish line, there will be the gift of motherhood. If you’re not prepared to endure hours of pain, confusion, and physical and mental anguish, you may not be prepared for the next step…parenting!

By: Krista Miracle (BirthFIT U partner; Doula Is In)

Krista's husband Mike finishing an Ironman

Krista’s husband Mike finishing an Ironman

Workout

 

Advanced

1 mile Run (1000m Row)

20 OHS

1 mile Run

20 OHS

1 mile Run

 

Intermediate

800m Run (750m Row)

10 OHS

800m Run

10 OHS

800m Run

 

Beginner

400m Run (500m Row)

5 OHS

400m Run

5 OHS

400m Run

 

Instructions & Modifications

  • Use a weight for the OHS that you can do 5-10 reps in a row.
  • If you want to row, then use the standards in parentheses.
  • If rowing or running is not your thing, then do super long farmer’s carry (400m, 200m, and 100m).
  • Doing this advanced, I finish after the 35 minute mark. Give yourself a 40 minute time cap if you want, but do work.
  • This is a long workout. Stay moving. Drink water. Have fun.