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The APGAR score was first introduced in the 1950s. It is a screening test used on newborns at 1-minute post birth and again at 5-minutes post birth. The total points available, or a perfect score, would be a 10, which rarely happens. This screen test evaluates the infant’s respiration, reflexes, pulse rate, appearance or skin color, and muscle tone.

The APGAR screen assesses the infant’s health and wellbeing at that particular moment in time. The APGAR screen does not predict the future health of your baby nor does it predict how the cognitive function of the baby human.

The APGAR score has limited time constraints and is very subjective. Drugs used during birth, trauma including (but not limited to) forcep use and/or cesarean section, congenital anomalies, infections, premature birth are all conditions that can affect the APGAR score.

As you may start to realize, the APGAR test should not be a basis for major health decisions. The test does not correlate to any outcomes or conditions that may happen in the next few minutes of life or the next twenty years of life. The APGAR screen test just lets us how the infant is doing at that moment in time.

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Dr. Stu’s Blog Post discussing APGAR scores and how two recent studies are flawed.

Workout

2 Rounds

2 minutes One Arm KB Swings

1 minute Rest

2 minutes KB Front Rack Walking Lunges

1 minute Rest

2 minutes Pull-ups

1 minute Rest

MODIFICATIONS

  • If you are elite, then you can do 3 rounds.
  • Keep the weights light to medium.
  • If regular KB swings feel better, by all means do them.
  • Ring rows can be substituted for pull-ups.